America

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Jul 27, 2014 / 66 notes

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom

This beautifully written book tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history—including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom.

Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, Ties That Bind vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her—her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children—but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots’s widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century.

The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story

At the turn of the nineteenth century, James Vann, a Cherokee chief and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill in Georgia, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. In this first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the plantation, Tiya Miles tells the story of Diamond Hill’s founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s.

This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries—from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book includes rich portraits of the women of these various communities. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier

Tiya Miles…

is a professor at the University of Michigan in the Department of American Culture, Department of Afro-American and African Studies, Department of History, Department of Women Studies, and Native American Studies Program. Her research and creative interests include African American and Native American interrelated and comparative histories (especially 19th century); Black, Native, and U.S. women’s histories; and African American and Native American women’s literature…continue reading

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Jul 23, 2014 / 283 notes

stereoculturesociety:

CultureSOUL: *Vintage* African Americans - The Inkwell, Santa Monica, CA – 1920s-1940s

From Vintage Everyday & BlackPast.org:

“During the early 20th century, a section of the Santa Monica Beach referred to as the “Ink Well” was one of the few areas in California where African Americans were allowed to enjoy beach access in a largely segregated society…. The derogatory term “The Inkwell” was used by nearby Anglos in reference to the skin color of the beach-goers. Such names existed for other beaches across the U.S. as well.  Nonetheless, African Americans in Southern California, like their counterparts elsewhere, transformed the hateful moniker into a badge of pride.”

There was an “Inkwell” area of Martha’s Vineyard on the east coast also. Today, many affluent AAs still summer there including the Obamas who are scheduled to vacation on the Vineyard next month. More info on Santa Monica’s Inkwell here and here.

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Jul 17, 2014 / 585 notes

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Jul 15, 2014 / 18,502 notes

wigglytuffer:

first things first i’m

image

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Jul 14, 2014 / 1,615 notes
Jul 12, 2014 / 1,488 notes
lastrealindians:

Lynwood His Bad Horse Jr. riding for the His Bad Horse team at the Sheridan Wyoming Rodeo Indian Relay Race yesterday. Photo by Diana Volk Photography
Jul 12, 2014 / 657 notes

lastrealindians:

Lynwood His Bad Horse Jr. riding for the His Bad Horse team at the Sheridan Wyoming Rodeo Indian Relay Race yesterday. Photo by Diana Volk Photography

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sequinedk:

fuegoking:

Lmao

Yeah, people are always trying to say that the GOPs actions have nothing to do with the fact that a black man is president. Sure it doesn’t. Maybe it’s not a conscious thing (although I highly doubt it), but it’s definitely a factor.
Jul 9, 2014 / 2,579 notes

sequinedk:

fuegoking:

Lmao

Yeah, people are always trying to say that the GOPs actions have nothing to do with the fact that a black man is president. Sure it doesn’t. Maybe it’s not a conscious thing (although I highly doubt it), but it’s definitely a factor.

(via anomaly1)

The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

Think about who’s in jail and why. 

(via amerikkkan-stories)

and that “crime” could be anything they felt like charging you with

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

This was how the myth of Black criminality started, for the record. After the abolition of slavery, a lot of states made laws targeting Black people specifically, and then put them on chain gangs to get free labor from them.

Oh, and the US is still disproportionately incarcerating Black people and private prisons are making huge amounts off them.

(via bunnybotbaby)

This is one of those pieces of information I wish had like 200 million notes on tumblr.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

meanwhile the dea teamed up with the cca

(via cxnfvsed-and-cxnflicted)

Yeah, I believe that black people are twice as likely to be arrested and convicted for committing the same crimes as a white person. Draw your own conclusions.

(via yesiamtheblack)

Reblogging this because everytime in real life I’ve said Slavery didn’t really end I’ve been dismissed as crazy.

(via locsgirl)

I’ll reblog this every time it comes up on my dash. People need to know!

(via andshegotthegirl)

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Jul 4, 2014 / 64,315 notes
Jul 4, 2014 / 25,252 notes

American flags from 1767 to present

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Jul 2, 2014 / 4,829 notes

fatnutritionist:

"People go to college because not going to college carries a penalty. College is a purchased loyalty oath to an imagined employer. College shows you are serious enough about your life to risk ruining it early on. College is a promise the economy does not keep - but not going to college promises you will struggle to survive."

Sarah Kendzior

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Jul 2, 2014 / 19,660 notes

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Jun 30, 2014 / 23,026 notes

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livinlavidaloca07:

"We don’t need no more rappers, we don’t need no more basketball players, no more football players. We need more thinkers. We need more scientists. We need more managers. We need more mathematicians. We need more teachers. We need more people who care; you know what I’m saying? We need more women, mothers, fathers, we need more of that, we don’t need any more entertainers." - Tupac Amaru Shakur
Jun 30, 2014 / 834 notes

livinlavidaloca07:

"We don’t need no more rappers, we don’t need no more basketball players, no more football players. We need more thinkers. We need more scientists. We need more managers. We need more mathematicians. We need more teachers. We need more people who care; you know what I’m saying? We need more women, mothers, fathers, we need more of that, we don’t need any more entertainers." - Tupac Amaru Shakur

(via tontonmichel)