Black man

The Latest

May 29, 2014 / 77 notes

fithunksss:

Jesse Williams

(via posttragicmulatto)

May 29, 2014 / 684 notes

French film actor Omar Sy in the June 2014 issue of French Vanity Fair

the-suit-man:

Suits, mens fashion and mens style inspiration http://the-suit-man.tumblr.com/
May 26, 2014 / 159 notes

the-suit-man:

Suits, mens fashion and mens style inspiration http://the-suit-man.tumblr.com/

May 24, 2014 / 3,750 notes

madeeinhonduras:

chrisozer:

Rog and Bee Walker

for the New York Times NYT Now campaign.

surplus amount of love for this

(via devoutfashion)

May 24, 2014 / 775 notes

yasboogie:

Sam Greenlee, Novelist And Author Of ‘The Spook Who Sat By The Door’ Dies In Chicago

Poet and novelist Sam Greenlee has died in Chicago at the age of 83.

Greenlee was best known for his 1969 novel “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” later adapted into a political drama movie. Close friend and cast member in the movie, Pemon Rami, says Greenlee died early Monday.

Greenlee was one of the first African Americans to join the U.S. foreign service. From 1957-1965, he worked for the U.S. Information Agency, serving in Iraq, Pakistan, Indonesia and Greece.

"The Spook Who Sat by the Door" tells the story of a black CIA agent who becomes a revolutionary training young Chicago blacks for a violent rebellion. His other works include "Baghdad Blues," in which he describes witnessing the 1958 revolution that brought down Iraq’s British-backed monarchy.

Images: Times Union, Nov. 8, 1973, Chicago

(via dormantgenius)

May 24, 2014 / 3,121 notes
humansofnewyork:

"Both my kids will have graduated from college in 4.5 years, and I’m heading to Mexico. I’m not kidding. Social Security goes a long way down there. For $300 a week, I could have a place to stay, a satellite dish, a fishing pole, and some rum."
May 21, 2014 / 2,925 notes

humansofnewyork:

"Both my kids will have graduated from college in 4.5 years, and I’m heading to Mexico. I’m not kidding. Social Security goes a long way down there. For $300 a week, I could have a place to stay, a satellite dish, a fishing pole, and some rum."

(via lovepeacehappinessalluneed)

humansofnewyork:

"My greatest struggle is trying to support my mom and sisters back in Jamaica. I try to send money back every month, but sometimes I just can’t do it after I’ve paid my bills. They really depend on the money, because my stepfather is a farmer and a lot of times the crops aren’t good. A lot of people back home think that money comes easy in America. They don’t know how hard it is."
May 21, 2014 / 4,764 notes

humansofnewyork:

"My greatest struggle is trying to support my mom and sisters back in Jamaica. I try to send money back every month, but sometimes I just can’t do it after I’ve paid my bills. They really depend on the money, because my stepfather is a farmer and a lot of times the crops aren’t good. A lot of people back home think that money comes easy in America. They don’t know how hard it is."

(via lovepeacehappinessalluneed)

May 9, 2014 / 1,676 notes

gradientlair:

artblackafrica:

Godfried Donkor, Jamestown Masquerade Series, 2011

Creative. Beautiful.

(via dynastylnoire)


‘And last, my mom. I don’t think you know what you did. You had my brother when you were 18 years old. Three years later, I came out. The odds were stacked against us, single parent with two boys by the time you were 21 years old. Everybody told us we weren’t supposed to be here. We moved from apartment to apartment by ourselves. One of the best memories I have is when we moved into our first apartment, no bed, no furniture and we just all sat in the living room and just hugged each other because we thought we made it.’ 

‘When something good happens to you, I don’t know about you guys, but I tend to look back to what brought me here. And you wake me up in the middle night in the summertime, making me run up the hill, making me do push-ups, screaming at me from the sidelines at my games at 8 or 9 years old. We weren’t supposed to be here. You made us believe, you kept us off the street, put clothes on our backs, food on the table. When you didn’t eat, you made sure we ate. You went to sleep hungry, you sacrificed for us. You’re the real MVP.’ 
Kevin Durant speaking about his mother Wanda Pratt at a jam-packed, festive reception in Oklahoma on Tuesday May 4, 2014. Durant received the NBA MVP Award.
May 7, 2014 / 99 notes

‘And last, my mom. I don’t think you know what you did. You had my brother when you were 18 years old. Three years later, I came out. The odds were stacked against us, single parent with two boys by the time you were 21 years old. Everybody told us we weren’t supposed to be here. We moved from apartment to apartment by ourselves. One of the best memories I have is when we moved into our first apartment, no bed, no furniture and we just all sat in the living room and just hugged each other because we thought we made it.’

‘When something good happens to you, I don’t know about you guys, but I tend to look back to what brought me here. And you wake me up in the middle night in the summertime, making me run up the hill, making me do push-ups, screaming at me from the sidelines at my games at 8 or 9 years old. We weren’t supposed to be here. You made us believe, you kept us off the street, put clothes on our backs, food on the table. When you didn’t eat, you made sure we ate. You went to sleep hungry, you sacrificed for us. You’re the real MVP.’

Kevin Durant speaking about his mother Wanda Pratt at a jam-packed, festive reception in Oklahoma on Tuesday May 4, 2014. Durant received the NBA MVP Award.

May 6, 2014 / 1,840 notes

lettherebemusicblog:

I was born by the river in a little tent
And just like that river I’ve been running ever since
It’s been a long time coming
But I know a change is gonna come, oh yes it will…

(via largerloves)

May 5, 2014 / 75,465 notes

(via obama2016)

May 4, 2014 / 36,890 notes
70sbestblackalbums:

champions 4ever
May 2, 2014 / 161 notes
70sbestblackalbums:

1982
“My looks and my voice,are the two things I can count on. How else do you think I’ve survived in this business?”
MARVIN GAYE
May 2, 2014 / 74 notes

70sbestblackalbums:

1982

“My looks and my voice,are the two things I can count on. How else do you think I’ve survived in this business?”

MARVIN GAYE

(via iknowwhythesongbirdsings)