Mexico

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Mar 20, 2014 / 13,705 notes

In September of 1829 slavery was prohibited in Mexico. Because the politically connected Texans were outraged, one month later, the law was changed to allow slavery only in Texas. A few months later in early 1830, Mexico altered its policy under a new government that was less interested in catering to Texas. Mexico passed a law that prohibited further American settlement, and banned importation of additional slaves into Texas. The Mexican abolition movement, following the pattern seen around the world, had apparently pressured for more restrictions. This was a strict proviso, but for the Texans it was survivable, as they already had thousands of slaves within Mexico. The law must have created difficulties for the Texans and been a great source of irritation to them as they worked to develop their slave labour based agricultural economy. There were other grievances by this time, such as the amount of taxes the Texans were required to pay, but none struck home so much as the “bread and butter” issue of slavery. Without it, the Texans could not make a profit and ultimately would be out of business.

As the American population of Texas grew increasingly disgruntled with the various restrictions imposed by Mexico, an independence movement developed led by Stephen Austin. He presented a petition for independence to the Mexican government in 1833, and was then arrested and jailed until 1835. In 1835, there were about 20,000 Texans and 4000 slaves in Texas. In December of 1835 the newly crowned dictator General Antonio Santa Anna amended the slavery laws to ban slavery in Texas.

The settlers and their newly freed leader Austin quickly announced that they would secede from Mexico. To the great dismay of the Texans, however, in December of 1835 President Santa Ana extended the slavery ban to Texas to appease Mexican abolitionists. The Texans immediately rebelled and declared that they were seceded from Mexico, and declared the Republic of Texas. One of their first actions was to ban free blacks from the Republic. Not content with the possibility of withdrawing from Texas, the Texans enlisted the help of citizens of the United States in order to preserve slavery and the huge tracts of cotton growing land. This resulted in the famous siege and battle at the Alamo, a Catholic mission taken over by the Texans.

Remembering The Alamo was just as much about slavery as it was about Texas freedom from the slave abolishing country of Mexico (via thehuskybro)

Just when I think nobody reads any of my posts, somebody will go digging through the crates and find something and prove me wrong.

Thanks for that and pass it on!

(via thehuskybro)

Remember: the “liberal” city I live in was NAMED after this dude.

(via seanpadilla)

(via frantzfandom)

Apr 14, 2013 / 1,265 notes
Apr 26, 2012 / 162 notes

Cave of the Crystals or Giant Crystal Cave (Spanish: Cueva de los Cristales) is a cave connected to the Naica Mine 300 metres (980 ft) below the surface in Naica, Chihuahua, Mexico. The main chamber contains giant selenite crystals (gypsum, CaSO4·2 H2O), some of the largest natural crystals ever found. The cave’s largest crystal found to date is 11 m (36 ft) in length, 4 m (13 ft) in diameter and 55 tons in weight. The cave is extremely hot with air temperatures reaching up to 58 °C (136 °F) with 90 to 99 percent humidity. The cave is relatively unexplored due to these factors. Without proper protection people can only endure approximately ten minutes of exposure at a time.

(via dynastylnoire)

A boy yawned while resting on crosses to be used during a re-enactment of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ on Good Friday in Iztapalapa, Mexico City.
Apr 9, 2012 / 1 note

A boy yawned while resting on crosses to be used during a re-enactment of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ on Good Friday in Iztapalapa, Mexico City.

A believer asking for a miracle emerged from mud in Monterrey, Mexico on Monday March 19, 2012. Thousands of believers participated in a procession to ask for miracles from Niño Fidencio, a deceased Mexican folk healer whose spirit still heals people, according to local legend.
Mar 20, 2012 / 2 notes

A believer asking for a miracle emerged from mud in Monterrey, Mexico on Monday March 19, 2012. Thousands of believers participated in a procession to ask for miracles from Niño Fidencio, a deceased Mexican folk healer whose spirit still heals people, according to local legend.