beauty

The Latest

Oct 18, 2014 / 218 notes

"I love the fact that she’s messy and mysterious and you don’t know who she is. She’s not necessarily nurturing and, ‘Come sit on my lap so I can talk to you, baby.’ She’s not the kind of person that—doesn’t need God, Jesus, or Buddha, because she knows all the answers. She’s messy. She’s a woman. She’s sexual. She’s vulnerable. And I think—I feel extremely fortunate that I am alive and still active and this role came to me at this point in my life.” [x]

(via c4mias)

Oct 18, 2014 / 17,037 notes

She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful. And let’s not forget that that wasn’t just Annalise taking it off: It was Davis, too—Davis, who remains brave in a world where a New York Times critic can get away with calling her ‘less classically beautiful.’x

(via leadencirclesdissolve)

Oct 18, 2014 / 782 notes
Oct 18, 2014 / 5,072 notes

iamasf:

African Pinups by MUTI

MUTI is a creative studio based in the city of Cape Town, South Africa.

http://www.behance.net/muti

http://studio-muti.tumblr.com/

(via mscindyrayshel)

Oct 16, 2014 / 434 notes

fyeahkerrywashington:

Allure | November 2014

On newsstands October 28.

(via myownsweetescape)

Oct 16, 2014 / 6,926 notes

Rapper/actress/producer/talk show host Queen Latifah on the November 2014 issue of Essence magazine.

(via gallifreyglo)

Oct 15, 2014 / 4,632 notes

devoutfashion:

Karen Walker Celebrates 10 Years Of Iconic Eyewear

Model: Nykhor Paul

(via blackstaraura)

Oct 15, 2014 / 92 notes
wikoni:

David Agbodji | Photo: Miguel Reveriego
Oct 14, 2014 / 10,821 notes

wikoni:

David Agbodji | Photo: Miguel Reveriego

(via vinniehatesyou)

Oct 14, 2014 / 659 notes

tayler-xo:

For everyone who keeps saying Viola Davis is ugly.

(via newmodelminority)

fashionsfromhistory:

La Capresses des Colonies
Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier
1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 
The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET
Oct 13, 2014 / 2,713 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

La Capresses des Colonies

Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier

1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 

The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET

(via croatianpriincess)

Oct 13, 2014 / 31 notes
wnderlst:

Arnarfjörður, Iceland | Haraldur Diego
Oct 9, 2014 / 4,271 notes

wnderlst:

Arnarfjörður, Iceland | Haraldur Diego

(via fitzisgold-win)

Oct 8, 2014 / 2,574 notes
Oct 5, 2014 / 2,581 notes

(via hall70)