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Jul 12, 2014 / 6,447 notes

kawahineaihonua:

West Papua - The secret war in Asia

The forgotten land of West Papua is under brutal Indonesian military occupation. Its tribal people are being slaughtered, and their unique environment destroyed. But the world is doing nothing to stop it. In 1963, in violation of international law, Indonesia occupied and colonised the West Papuan homeland in the western part of New Guinea. Since that tragic event the West Papuans are asking for a fair referendum about their independence. At least 100.000 indigenous people lost their lives in this secret war.

FREE WEST PAPUA

(via stayingwoke)

Jul 10, 2014 / 65,619 notes

fuckyescalifornia:

seraphica:

Photographer Franck Bohbot captures the classic movie palaces of southern California [x]

*fans self*

(via catiebat)

Jul 7, 2014 / 2,177 notes
Jul 4, 2014 / 27,490 notes

American flags from 1767 to present

(via corinnestark)

Jul 2, 2014 / 9,470 notes

lostinurbanism:

Alain Le Garsmeur, Georgia (1983)

Jul 2, 2014 / 443,953 notes

Some things change, some things remain the same…

(via sweet-lady1823)

Jun 28, 2014 / 8,915 notes

yagazieemezi:

Vintage portraits taken of people in Eritrea in the 1930s.

From photographer Mario (not sure if he took actual photographs though)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via 2brwngrls)

vintagegal:

Chet Baker and wife Halema Alli photographed by William Claxton, Redondo Beach, 1955
Jun 23, 2014 / 2,096 notes

vintagegal:

Chet Baker and wife Halema Alli photographed by William Claxton, Redondo Beach, 1955

(via theblacksophisticate)

fascinasians:

On June 19, 1982, a young Chinese American man named Vincent Chin was brutally beaten to death in Detroit, Michigan. Vincent had been at his bachelor party with friends at a local suburban bar when Chrysler superintendent Ronald Ebens and his stepson Michael Nitz insulted Vincent: “It’s because of you little motherfuckers that we’re out of work.” Ebens and Nitz were found guilty of manslaughter and charged three years of probation, a $3,000 fine, and $780 in court fees without spending a day in jail.
32 years ago, Vincent Chin was beaten to death by two white auto workers because “It’s because of motherfuckers like you we’re out of jobs”. The two men were fined $3000 each and never served a day in jail for murdering 27 year old Vincent with a baseball bat. #NeverForget how the justice system failed us. Never Forget the name #VincentChin.
The murder of Vincent Chin became a pivotal point for the Asian American community and is often considered to be the beginning of the pan-Asian civil rights movement. 
Jun 20, 2014 / 9,422 notes

fascinasians:

On June 19, 1982, a young Chinese American man named Vincent Chin was brutally beaten to death in Detroit, Michigan. Vincent had been at his bachelor party with friends at a local suburban bar when Chrysler superintendent Ronald Ebens and his stepson Michael Nitz insulted Vincent: “It’s because of you little motherfuckers that we’re out of work.” Ebens and Nitz were found guilty of manslaughter and charged three years of probation, a $3,000 fine, and $780 in court fees without spending a day in jail.


32 years ago, Vincent Chin was beaten to death by two white auto workers because “It’s because of motherfuckers like you we’re out of jobs”. The two men were fined $3000 each and never served a day in jail for murdering 27 year old Vincent with a baseball bat. #NeverForget how the justice system failed us. Never Forget the name #VincentChin.

The murder of Vincent Chin became a pivotal point for the Asian American community and is often considered to be the beginning of the pan-Asian civil rights movement. 

(via myownsweetescape)

fyblackwomenart:

Harriet Tubman by PyloInteresting Facts about Harriet Tubman: 1. Harriet Tubman was born Araminta Ross. She would later adopt the name “Harriet” after her mother: Harriet Ross. The surname Tubman comes from her first husband, John Tubman, who she married in 1844. 2. Harriet earned the nickname “Moses” after the prophet Moses in the Bible who led his people to freedom. In all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.” 3. Harriet wore many hats: She was an active proponent of women’s suffrage and worked alongside women such as side Susan B. Anthony. During the civil war, Harriet also worked for the Union Army as a cook, a nurse and even a spy. 4. Harriet was acquainted with leading abolitionists of the day, including John Brown who conferred with “General Tubman” about his plans to raid Harpers Ferry. 5. Harriet had one daughter, Gertie, whom she and her second husband (Nelson Davis) adopted after the Civil war. 6. Harriet suffered life-long headaches, seizures and had vivid dreams as a result of a traumatic head injury she suffered as a teenager while trying to stand up for a fellow field hand. These same symptoms gave her powerful visions that she ascribed to God and helped guide her on many trips to the North while leading others to freedom. 7. Just before Harriet’s death in 1913 she told friends and family, “I go to prepare a place for you.” She was buried with military honors in Fort Hill Cemetery in New York.
Jun 20, 2014 / 1,615 notes

fyblackwomenart:

Harriet Tubman by Pylo
Interesting Facts about Harriet Tubman:
1. Harriet Tubman was born Araminta Ross. She would later adopt the name “Harriet” after her mother: Harriet Ross. The surname Tubman comes from her first husband, John Tubman, who she married in 1844.
2. Harriet earned the nickname “Moses” after the prophet Moses in the Bible who led his people to freedom. In all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”
3. Harriet wore many hats: She was an active proponent of women’s suffrage and worked alongside women such as side Susan B. Anthony. During the civil war, Harriet also worked for the Union Army as a cook, a nurse and even a spy.
4. Harriet was acquainted with leading abolitionists of the day, including John Brown who conferred with “General Tubman” about his plans to raid Harpers Ferry.
5. Harriet had one daughter, Gertie, whom she and her second husband (Nelson Davis) adopted after the Civil war.
6. Harriet suffered life-long headaches, seizures and had vivid dreams as a result of a traumatic head injury she suffered as a teenager while trying to stand up for a fellow field hand. These same symptoms gave her powerful visions that she ascribed to God and helped guide her on many trips to the North while leading others to freedom.
7. Just before Harriet’s death in 1913 she told friends and family, “I go to prepare a place for you.” She was buried with military honors in Fort Hill Cemetery in New York.

(via wetravelfast00)

[Patsey] had a genial and pleasant temper, and was faithful and obedient. Naturally, she was a joyous creature, a laughing, light-hearted girl, rejoicing in the mere sense of existence. Yet Patsey wept oftener and suffered more than any of her companions. She had been literally excoriated. Her back bore the scars of a thousand stripes, not because she was backward in her work, nor because she was of an unmindful and rebellious spirit, but because it had fallen to her lot to be the slave of a licentious master and a jealous mistress. She shrank before the lustful eye of the one, and was in danger even of her life at the hands of the other, and between the two she was indeed accursed.

In the great house, for days together, there were high and angry words, poutings and estrangement, whereof she was the innocent cause. Nothing delighted the mistress so much as to see her suffer, and more than once, when Epps had refused to sell her, has she tempted me with bribes to put her secretly to death and bury her body in some lonely place in the margin of the swamp. Gladly would Patsey have appeased this unforgiving spirit if it had been in her power, but not like Joseph, dared she escape from Master Epps, leaving her garment in his hand. Patsey walked under a cloud. If she uttered a word in opposition to her master’s will, the lash was resorted to at once to bring her to subjection. If she was not watchful when about her cabin, or when walking in the yard, a billet of wood or a broken bottle, perhaps, hurled from her mistress’ hand, would smite her unexpectedly in the face. The enslaved victim of lust and hate, Patsey had no comfort of her life.

SOLOMON NORTHUP, Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, 1853

National Humanities Center, On the Masters’ Sexual Abuse of Slaves: Selections from 19th- & 20th-c. Slave Narratives 

(via heytoyourmamanem)
Jun 19, 2014 / 24 notes
heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas, At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938
Source: American Memory, Library of Congress
Jun 19, 2014 / 2,758 notes

heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas, At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938

Source: American Memory, Library of Congress

so-treu:

soflyniggaswannastalkme:

medschoolsb:

theunpopopinions:

medschoolsb:

gadaboutgreen:

siddharthasmama:

auntada:

“I was born March 23, 1850 in Kentucky, somewhere near Louisville. I am goin’ on 88 years right now. (1937). I was brought to Missouri when I was six months old, along with my mama, who was a slave owned by a man named Shaw, who had allotted her to a man named Jimmie Graves, who came to Missouri to live with his daughter Emily Graves Crowdes. I always lived with Emily Crowdes.”
The matter of allotment was confusing to the interviewer and Aunt Sally endeavored to explain.
“Yes’m. Allotted? Yes’m. I’m goin’ to explain that, ” she replied. “You see there was slave traders in those days, jes’ like you got horse and mule an’ auto traders now. They bought and sold slaves and hired ‘em out. Yes’m, rented ‘em out. Allotted means somethin’ like hired out. But the slave never got no wages. That all went to the master. The man they was allotted to paid the master.”
“I was never sold. My mama was sold only once, but she was hired out many times. Yes’m when a slave was allotted, somebody made a down payment and gave a mortgage for the rest. A chattel mortgage… .”
“Allotments made a lot of grief for the slaves,” Aunt Sally asserted. “We left my papa in Kentucky, ‘cause he was allotted to another man. My papa never knew where my mama went, an’ my mama never knew where papa went.” Aunt Sally paused a moment, then went on bitterly. “They never wanted mama to know, ‘cause they knowed she would never marry so long she knew where he was. Our master wanted her to marry again and raise more children to be slaves. They never wanted mama to know where papa was, an’ she never did,” sighed Aunt Sally.
Sarah Frances Shaw Graves, Age 87
Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938
Library of Congress, Digital ID mesnp 100126

the bold breaks my heart. this is what gave rise to the capitalism we know today. this is cruel.

I want people to know this wasn’t a long time ago. This was one or two generations ago.

WOW!

My grandmother was born in 1944. This really isn’t that long ago. Someone pointed out to me the other day that black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.

“black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.”
I’ve heard this before too….smh

My grandmother was married by the time this statement was taken. Born in 1919. My great aunt was 39 in 37, born in 1898. She only JUST died 10 years ago, yes, at over 100 years old.This is not that fucking long ago. This woman could’ve been my fucking great-grandmother’s older sibling.

I think my great-grandfather was actually born around the same time……….
Jun 18, 2014 / 5,649 notes

so-treu:

soflyniggaswannastalkme:

medschoolsb:

theunpopopinions:

medschoolsb:

gadaboutgreen:

siddharthasmama:

auntada:

“I was born March 23, 1850 in Kentucky, somewhere near Louisville. I am goin’ on 88 years right now. (1937). I was brought to Missouri when I was six months old, along with my mama, who was a slave owned by a man named Shaw, who had allotted her to a man named Jimmie Graves, who came to Missouri to live with his daughter Emily Graves Crowdes. I always lived with Emily Crowdes.”

The matter of allotment was confusing to the interviewer and Aunt Sally endeavored to explain.

“Yes’m. Allotted? Yes’m. I’m goin’ to explain that, ” she replied. “You see there was slave traders in those days, jes’ like you got horse and mule an’ auto traders now. They bought and sold slaves and hired ‘em out. Yes’m, rented ‘em out. Allotted means somethin’ like hired out. But the slave never got no wages. That all went to the master. The man they was allotted to paid the master.”

“I was never sold. My mama was sold only once, but she was hired out many times. Yes’m when a slave was allotted, somebody made a down payment and gave a mortgage for the rest. A chattel mortgage… .”

“Allotments made a lot of grief for the slaves,” Aunt Sally asserted. “We left my papa in Kentucky, ‘cause he was allotted to another man. My papa never knew where my mama went, an’ my mama never knew where papa went.” Aunt Sally paused a moment, then went on bitterly. “They never wanted mama to know, ‘cause they knowed she would never marry so long she knew where he was. Our master wanted her to marry again and raise more children to be slaves. They never wanted mama to know where papa was, an’ she never did,” sighed Aunt Sally.

Sarah Frances Shaw Graves, Age 87

Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938

Library of Congress, Digital ID mesnp 100126

the bold breaks my heart. this is what gave rise to the capitalism we know today. this is cruel.

I want people to know this wasn’t a long time ago. This was one or two generations ago.

WOW!

My grandmother was born in 1944. This really isn’t that long ago. Someone pointed out to me the other day that black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.

black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.

I’ve heard this before too….smh

My grandmother was married by the time this statement was taken. Born in 1919. My great aunt was 39 in 37, born in 1898. She only JUST died 10 years ago, yes, at over 100 years old.

This is not that fucking long ago. This woman could’ve been my fucking great-grandmother’s older sibling.

I think my great-grandfather was actually born around the same time……….

(via blackfeminism)

Jun 16, 2014 / 1,083 notes

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

In Her Hands: The Story of Sculptor Augusta Savage

Alan Schroeder

As a young girl in Florida in the 1890s, Augusta enjoyed nothing more than playing with clay. She would happily sculpt it into little figures: cows, chickens, and ducks. Augusta’s mother didn’t mind but her father, a stern preacher, felt the girl was wasting time on idle nonsense.

With her mother’s support, Augusta’s sculpting talent blossomed as she grew into a young woman. Eventually, Augusta found herself at a crossroad. She wanted to pursue a career as an artist, but to do so she would have to leave behind all she knew. With only her passion to guide her, Augusta headed to New York City to follow her dream wherever it might take her.

Award-winning author Alan Schroeder deftly weaves together known historical details to create a compelling portrait of this unique Harlem Renaissance sculptor. Warm, inviting paintings capture both Augusta Savage’s struggles and resilience as she skillfully carved out her own special place in art history.

Read more: http://www.florida-arts.org/programs/ahf/displayArtist.cfm?member=41

(via posttragicmulatto-deactivated20)

Jun 15, 2014 / 1,039 notes

wespeakfortheearth:

The real-life Django: The legendary African-American Wild West marshal who arrested 3,000 outlaws and killed 14 men

Bass Reeves, one of the first African Americans to become a Deputy U.S. Marshal west of the Mississippi River, could have been an inspiration for Quentin Tarantino’s fictional character Django.

Reeves, who was born a slave, arrested 3,000 felons, killed 14 men and was never shot throughout his 32-year career as a federal lawman.

The fearless solider was born into slavery in 1838 in Crawford County, Arkansas, and eventually broke from his owner, George Reeves, to live among the Creek and Seminole Indians.

During his time with them, he learned their customs and languages and became an adept territorial scout.

Reeves later procured his own land in Van Buren, Arkansas, where he married his wife, Nellie Jennie, built an eight-room house with his bare hands, and raised ten children as the first black settler in the region.

He became a Deputy U.S. Marshal in 1875 at the age of 38, after ‘Hanging Judge’ Isaac C. Parker was made the federal judge of Indian Territory. Under President Ulysses S. Grant, Parker appointed Confederate Army General James Fagan a U.S. Marshal and ordered him to hire 200 deputies. Among them was Reeves.

Fagan knew of the former slave, his ability to negotiate Indian Territory and his ability to speak their languages, and so Reeves was named the first black Deputy Marshal west of the Mississippi.

In that role he was authorized to arrest both black and white outlaws.

(via afro-dominicano)